Meanwhile, in the Muniverse...

Dispatches from San Francisco's beloved and beleaguered Municipal Railway.

theatlantic.com

Driving the Highway Trust Fund Into the Ground →

The Highway Trust Fund primarily supports our road and highway system, but a portion is also set aside for transit, bike and pedestrian projects that reduce traffic. 25% of bridges rate as “structurally deficient” and without a new bill, funding for all of this will run out next month.

sfweekly.com

Mayor Ed Lee Has a Trail of Vanishing Parking Tickets →

And that’s only covers the times in which the Mayor was ticketed. Last month, the Mayor’s Volt was photographed

DC NOT RESPONDING

Maybe this Clipper Card machine making a statement about Federal transit funding.

DC NOT RESPONDING

Maybe this Clipper Card machine making a statement about Federal transit funding.

Source: tantek

At a Muni island bus stop on Market Street near 4th.

Muni most likely means “wait” instead of “stay” because following the rules you would never be able to board a Muni vehicle.

At a Muni island bus stop on Market Street near 4th.

Muni most likely means “wait” instead of “stay” because following the rules you would never be able to board a Muni vehicle.

Source: dwrhodes

Rail Transport in Westeros by Michael Tyznik
Not the first Game of Thrones/A Song of Ice of Fire transit map I’ve seen, but definitely the best designed. It was created by Michael Tyznik, who also made this great fantasy map of Columbus (May 2012, 4 stars).
I do detect the influence of my TGV Routes of France map in this work — the general station symbology, the curved routes lines out of King’s Landing and the use of colour coding to define route groups — but Michael has done a fine job of taking things further. His intelligent use of non-standard angles keeps the map nice and compact, but also creates some nice, fun visual shapes. The typeface looks like the superb Source Sans Pro from Adobe, a definite favourite of mine…


There are some great close up detail images and prints of are available for both Westeros and the Known World.

Be warned though, these maps do contain spoilers.

Rail Transport in Westeros by Michael Tyznik

Not the first Game of Thrones/A Song of Ice of Fire transit map I’ve seen, but definitely the best designed. It was created by Michael Tyznik, who also made this great fantasy map of Columbus (May 2012, 4 stars).

I do detect the influence of my TGV Routes of France map in this work — the general station symbology, the curved routes lines out of King’s Landing and the use of colour coding to define route groups — but Michael has done a fine job of taking things further. His intelligent use of non-standard angles keeps the map nice and compact, but also creates some nice, fun visual shapes. The typeface looks like the superb Source Sans Pro from Adobe, a definite favourite of mine…

There are some great close up detail images and prints of are available for both Westeros and the Known World.

Be warned though, these maps do contain spoilers.

(via transitmaps)

Source: behance.net

History on rails. (at F Street Car Muni Stop - Don Chee Way)

One of the historic PCC type of streetcars, painted in the colors of Cincinnati where they ran from 1939-1951.

History on rails. (at F Street Car Muni Stop - Don Chee Way)

One of the historic PCC type of streetcars, painted in the colors of Cincinnati where they ran from 1939-1951.

Source: aspiejourno

A few months ago Muni began an experiment to increase capacity on Muni Metro, with a reconfigured light-rail vehicle that has more floor space.

Its 14 double-wide seats were replaced with seven single seats. It’s certain the change did not go unnoticed.

"Normally on the aisle of the light-rail vehicle it allows for two rows of people, and no one can get in between them," said Supervisor Scott Wiener, who that morning boarded the re-configured car at Ninth and Irving streets. "Now you have people holding on to the handrail and an entire row of people could file in between them. To me it seems positive."

A few month in the SFMTA is looking to reconfigure more trains.

John Haley, director of transit, said riders could see more of these trains soon, but did [not] say when or how many more trains would be converted to the new seat configuration.
Riders were given a chance to take an online survey on whether they liked the new seat configuration.
Haley said surprisingly that the new seat configuration received more negative feedback than expected, but said riders who gave the negative feedback had boarded near the line’s terminal. Riders who boarded at the often crowded Carl and Cole streets N-Judah stop favorably rated the Muni train with fewer seats.

Removing more seats is certain to upset more riders, but trains are already at capacity, and with new trains still a few years away, removing seats comes down to the math that people stand in the space of one person setting.

The next generation Muni Metro trains will likely have longitudinal seating (benches along the side walls) that provides more space to both sit and stand. There will also be an extra 64 trains-worth of seats because the SFMTA has purchased 215 trains to replace the existing fleet of only 151.

Photo: SF Examiner

A few months ago Muni began an experiment to increase capacity on Muni Metro, with a reconfigured light-rail vehicle that has more floor space.

Its 14 double-wide seats were replaced with seven single seats. It’s certain the change did not go unnoticed.

"Normally on the aisle of the light-rail vehicle it allows for two rows of people, and no one can get in between them," said Supervisor Scott Wiener, who that morning boarded the re-configured car at Ninth and Irving streets. "Now you have people holding on to the handrail and an entire row of people could file in between them. To me it seems positive."

A few month in the SFMTA is looking to reconfigure more trains.

John Haley, director of transit, said riders could see more of these trains soon, but did [not] say when or how many more trains would be converted to the new seat configuration.

Riders were given a chance to take an online survey on whether they liked the new seat configuration.

Haley said surprisingly that the new seat configuration received more negative feedback than expected, but said riders who gave the negative feedback had boarded near the line’s terminal. Riders who boarded at the often crowded Carl and Cole streets N-Judah stop favorably rated the Muni train with fewer seats.

Removing more seats is certain to upset more riders, but trains are already at capacity, and with new trains still a few years away, removing seats comes down to the math that people stand in the space of one person setting.

The next generation Muni Metro trains will likely have longitudinal seating (benches along the side walls) that provides more space to both sit and stand. There will also be an extra 64 trains-worth of seats because the SFMTA has purchased 215 trains to replace the existing fleet of only 151.

Photo: SF Examiner

sf.streetsblog.org

SFMTA to Paint the Transit Lanes Red on Mid-Market This Weekend →

The SFMTA announced that red paint will be added this weekend to the transit- and taxi-only lanes on mid-Market Street, between Fifth and 12th Streets. The treatment, already rolled out recently on bus lanes on Third Street and the Geary-O’Farrell Street couplet, is intended to make it more obvious that private auto drivers shouldn’t be in the heavily-abused Muni lanes.

“These lanes represent a low-cost, but high-impact measure to decrease travel time, by preventing cars from using transit-only lanes,” SFMTA Director Ed Reiskin said in a statement.

Streetsblog has previous reported on the Church Street pilot’s performance find that just the initial three block trial reduced travel times by 5% and improved reliability (keeping on time) by 20% on that segment.

Even though there are plenty of drivers who abuse them, the vast majority are keeping the lanes clear for Muni.

Meanwhile, Los Angeles has been promoting transit ridership…

While our Transbay Terminal continues to be stripped of everything nice for residents and transit riders, now would be a good time to look at how Los Angels Metro has been creating a well designed system.

Through a rebranding with consistent information and signage, better and more attractive stops and stations, some of the major ones with very high-end unique and memorable designs, LA Metro was about to attract 32% more choice riders. Choice riders are those who have a car or would use car share, but choose transit instead.

Source: vimeo.com

sfgate.com

Transbay Terminal will open without its signature park →

Having already replaced the new terminal’s glass windows with drafty metal grating and high quality finishing materials inside will be stripped to bare concrete and steel, comes word the 4.5 acre rooftop park is now out as well.

But why waste money making the Transbay Terminal pleasant? If that’s what transbay commuters want, they should just buy a car and drive.

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