Muniverse

Prop B: Opposing Views on Dedicated Muni Funding

San Francisco’s proposition B (November 2014) establishes a minimum amount of funding the city must provide from the General Fund to support Muni service.

75% of the funding is dedicated solely to implement and support Muni service improvements, increase capacity, maintain vehicles, and keep infrastructure in a state of good repair. 25% is to be used for capitol projects that will improve safety for all road users.

Today the San Francisco Chronicle published opposing editorials on the matter. One in support of Prop B:

Proposition B is a commonsense measure to improve our transportation system by tying funding to population growth. As more people move to San Francisco, Prop. B will give Muni more money to keep up, by adjusting the formula that pays for Muni service.

Since 2003, San Francisco has grown by 85,000 people and Muni has become overcrowded and unreliable. Buses and trains break down too often and don’t run frequently enough.

Another editorial against Prop B argues for essentially the status quo:

Money should only be spent in short-term appropriations for immediate governmental needs.

Prop. B is tax waste on its face, with no review of actual governmental needs being made by the Board of Supervisors or any other legislative body. In practice, governmental bodies almost never return extra, unneeded monies for fear that this might increase legislative review of their next annual budget request and will cost them money when they actually need it.

Many consider it a problem that politicians pick-and-choose only short-term projects – popular with voters at the moment – without enough consideration to how they will be maintained or funded in the long run.

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Last month the SFMTA placed the order for the next generation of Muni Metro trains, but deciding on a model didn’t mean every detail was approved at that time. There are still a lot of design choices to be worked out and the SFMTA has posted a survey to start gathering rider feedback.

Take this once-in-a-generation opportunity to provide input on interior features like seating preferences, interior color schemes and layout, to guide our design decisions. Make your Muni experience more comfortable by providing your input on these design treatments.

In the survey SFMTA is asking about the importance of bike storage and this is the opportunity to bring bikes of Muni trains.

For the exterior, there isn’t a real choice, with only four slight variations on the primer gray dull red colors used on the current trains.

For a once-in-a-generation opportunity, shouldn’t we actually be able to choose a different color scheme other than just the one that’s been used for the last 20 years?

SFMTA has not even included the more vibrant red/black/gray design created by Siemens which is being used to promote the survey.

So what would you like to see changed, added, or removed in the next Muni trains?

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A Winning Team and Busy BART trains

Ridership climbed to 462,242 yesterday - the fourth busiest day ever for BART - as fans headed out to cheer their Giants on to win the National League Championship. Now BART is getting ready for the World Series next week and -yes, yes, yes- the possibility of another World Series victory parade.

BART’s two busiest days were during the 2012 and 2010 World Series victory celebrations. The third busiest day during one of the Bay Bridge closures, meaning the Giants also win the busiest BART train series as well.

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Congratulations to the San Francisco Giants on their win last night over the St. Louis Cardinals. Having won the National League championship, the Giants are Heading to the World Series. Again.

Congratulations to the San Francisco Giants on their win last night over the St. Louis Cardinals. Having won the National League championship, the Giants are Heading to the World Series. Again.

Source: thesfcitykid

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New 5L-Fulton Limited Muni Line Has Brought 2,000 More Daily Riders →

Muni’s one-year-old 5L-Fulton Limited service, which provides a crosstown trip 15 percent faster than the 5-Fulton, has attracted 2,000 additional daily riders to the bus route. That’s according to new data from the SFMTA.

More details will come out when the report is presented to the SFMTA Board on Tuesday, we can probably assume some of that ridership came out of the 21-Hayes, walk, or bike. That certainly can’t account for all 2,000 daily riders and likely still means many hundreds of cars fewer on the road from just this one corridor alone.

Limited-stop service on the 5 has been met with virtually universal praise ever since it was introduced as a pilot project last October, and later made permanent by the SFMTA. The agency also made improvements that speed up both local and limited service, like a road diet that created wider lanes for buses on one section, and removing some lesser-used stops. The SFMTA also plans to install transit-priority traffic signals and bus bulbs along the route.

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Fremont's imaginative planning puts San Francisco's to shame →

The Bold Italic discovered Powell Station once housed an arcade.

When BART was sleek and new and Atari was a video game system that people played without nostalgia, this happened in the Powell Street BART station: there was, once upon a time, a six paneled Atari kiosk inside of it.

Photo: Pinball Pirate via  The Bold Italic

The Bold Italic discovered Powell Station once housed an arcade.

When BART was sleek and new and Atari was a video game system that people played without nostalgia, this happened in the Powell Street BART station: there was, once upon a time, a six paneled Atari kiosk inside of it.

Photo: Pinball Pirate via The Bold Italic

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$100 Parking Spots Advertised Ahead Of Giants-Cardinals Playoff Game  →

CBS found some parking as low as $80, even round trip Muni is only $4.5. Does it help that you’d be riding a party train with other excited Giants fans?

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Muni looks to speed up 9-San Bruno →

Several other stops will be receiving bulb outs and boarding islands. Moving some stops from before to after the intersection will avoid backups with waiting cars.

One of the biggest time saving improvements will be new signal lights prioritizing busses. Combined with stops after the intersection a signal can detect a coming bus and hold the green long enough to let the bus through. It will have time to board and move on before traffic behind it starts moving again.

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Big Hero San Francisco

Walt Disney Animation Studios latest film “Big Hero 6” opens next month, set in version of San Francisco mashed up with Tokyo. Disney has posted footage of a cable car and Gizmodo has more info.

Geographically, San Fransokyo is San Francisco. In fact, it’s pretty much an exact representation: The animators used detailed property data from the city’s Assessor-Recorder’s office—available thanks to the city’s progressive open data program—to get detailed information about the city’s 83,000 buildings and the nearly exact number and location of elements like streetlights and street trees. “We don’t claim you can find your house” says Big Hero 6’s technical supervisor Hank Driskill. “But if you go to where your house is, you’ll find the right building of the right size.”

The visual effects team recreated 23 separate districts, each of which has its own hybridized Pacific Rim architectural style. Even though the overall result immediately registers as San Francisco, the specific details in the streetscape are less recognizable. Almost all the signage is in Japanese (and there’s a lot of advertising). Even the Golden Gate Bridge has its own Tokyo twist.

Big Hero San Francisco

Walt Disney Animation Studios latest film “Big Hero 6” opens next month, set in version of San Francisco mashed up with Tokyo. Disney has posted footage of a cable car and Gizmodo has more info.

Geographically, San Fransokyo is San Francisco. In fact, it’s pretty much an exact representation: The animators used detailed property data from the city’s Assessor-Recorder’s office—available thanks to the city’s progressive open data program—to get detailed information about the city’s 83,000 buildings and the nearly exact number and location of elements like streetlights and street trees. “We don’t claim you can find your house” says Big Hero 6’s technical supervisor Hank Driskill. “But if you go to where your house is, you’ll find the right building of the right size.”

The visual effects team recreated 23 separate districts, each of which has its own hybridized Pacific Rim architectural style. Even though the overall result immediately registers as San Francisco, the specific details in the streetscape are less recognizable. Almost all the signage is in Japanese (and there’s a lot of advertising). Even the Golden Gate Bridge has its own Tokyo twist.

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