Muniverse

sfexaminer.com

SFMTA hearing to address near-term service response before new light-rail cars arrive →

Limited Use Ticket - Valid On Muni Vehicles Only

Including Milan trams, British boat trams, New Orlean streetcar, the ones from Sydney and Philadelp… it goes on like that that. In fact it might not be a bad idea to put “Not valid on BART” on it the ticket. Plenty of visitors and casual riders don’t always know exactly who runs what.

Limited Use Ticket - Valid On Muni Vehicles Only

Including Milan trams, British boat trams, New Orlean streetcar, the ones from Sydney and Philadelp… it goes on like that that. In fact it might not be a bad idea to put “Not valid on BART” on it the ticket. Plenty of visitors and casual riders don’t always know exactly who runs what.

Source: theheartofasadpunk

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sfmta.com

New Accessible Muni Platform Coming Soon at Balboa Park →

The larger project mentions includes a new BART entrance and a new walkway for Muni elevated platforms.

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surveygizmo.com

Inner Sunset Streetscape Changes Survey →

SFMTA is planning a series of traffic and streetscape changes around 9th & Irving – one of the biggest pinch-points in the Muni Metro light-rail network – and is surveying residents and rider regarding the different design options.

You only have three days.

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San Diego streetcar no.1078 near Fisherman’s Wharf. Many of the art deco style PCC streetcars have been sold and resold a number times leading to some odd lineages.

Streetcar no. 1078 was originally built for Minneapolis, sold to New Jersey Transit, then bought by Muni to be painted in San Diego’s color scheme.

Meanwhile, San Diego started a historic streetcar line using PCC streetcars from several cities – including old Muni cars – all repainted in this same color scheme. And a really classy one too.

San Diego streetcar no.1078 near Fisherman’s Wharf. Many of the art deco style PCC streetcars have been sold and resold a number times leading to some odd lineages.

Streetcar no. 1078 was originally built for Minneapolis, sold to New Jersey Transit, then bought by Muni to be painted in San Diego’s color scheme.

Meanwhile, San Diego started a historic streetcar line using PCC streetcars from several cities – including old Muni cars – all repainted in this same color scheme. And a really classy one too.

Source: sfcitylights

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Brannan and the Embarcadero, outbound.

Brannan and the Embarcadero, outbound.

Source: dredaygold

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Jamison provides a short history of the KT-Ingleside/Third Street line.

When San Franicsco’s Central Subway opens in 2019 it will have been a full thirty years from the time voters approved first the four-corridors plan in 1989. Together the subway and surface section of of the T-Third Street Muni Metro line are two of the corridors, dedicated Muni busways Van Ness Avenue and Geary Boulevard are the other two.

The Muni Metro light-rail (shown in orange) opened in 1980 with five former trolley lines converging into the upper level of the Market Street Subway (BART runs on the lower level and opened in 1973) and extended in 1995 on the surface along the waterfront to AT&T Park (Go Giants!) and Caltrain. The lines were configured so the JKLM lines ended at the last subway station at waterfront and the N-Judah alone traveled along the surface.

In 2007 the first phase of the T-Third Street light-rail line (red) opened. The subway section was still at least a decade off so the new line running up the eastern waterfront was connected up with the existing trackway running into the Market Street Subway. This turned out to be a disaster that had delays upwards of 20 minutes on a daily basis for the first six months.

T-line trains were to turn-back at Castro Station, while the rest of the lines continued on. Without a third track for T-line trains to layover on, trains had to switch directly from the outbound to inbound track before it could board and heading back. Switching over blocked traffic in both directions, having to wait for the track to clear made it even worse. This created an unavoidable delay a few minutes long, every 8-10 minutes.

After six months the whole thing was rejiggered. T-Line trains no longer turned around at Castro and the solution was just to extend K-Ingleside line the entire way down Third Street. Trains change name entering the tunnel at either end which created the current KT-Ingleside/Third Street.

The turn-back at Castro was only one of the problems, Muni still doesn’t have enough vehicles (only last week did Muni order more trains for the T-Line) and the 90 degree turn at by the ballpark is still creating an extra signal phase that stops car and rail traffic so KT trains can make the turn.

In 2019 the Central Subway is planned to open and the T-line will no longer make that ninety degree turn. They will instead continue north, entering a tunnel to Chinatown.

At that point the K-Ingleside will go back to stopping at the Embarcadero subway station (along with the JLM lines) and the N-Judah trains running along the waterfront will cross the T at a right angle. The lines have separate platforms in the medians and trains will be able to with car traffic (and without extra signal phases) so neither one will be getting in the other’s way. With the new trains that takes care of the three biggest delay sources of delays on the KT and N lines.

Even the naming starts making more sense; the consecutively lettered JKLMN lines will run through a different subway than the T line runs through.

Source: jamisonwieser

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We’re On Pinterest

Muniverse is on Pinterest now. We’ve actually had the account for a while but only recently started using it as a source for Muni photos and we want to contribute back.

Come follow us or one of our boards on Pinterest.

Forest Hill, New York

atomberea commenting on a photo of Forest Hill Station.

I’ve always felt the Forest Hill Station is the most New-York-Subway-looking of MUNI stations.

In at least one case Forest Hill Station did double for a New York Subway station. In the opening scene of the movie Milk, one of the stairways stood in for the New York subway station where Harvey Milk met Scott Smith before they moved to San Francisco together.

It originally looked even more like an old-school east coast subway station when it opened in the 1930s. What we see today is a 1970s remodel.

Source: atomberea

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Not every decision for the Central Subway had to be made up front. There was a lot of engineering and design that had to be done for the subway and the stations, but to do on top of them was left for another day. Now that construction is in full swing it’s time to settle what’s going on top of Chinatown Station.

The design for the Chinatown station itself was approved with a transit-oriented development to complement it in mind. In determining what to build above the station, The City opened the process to community groups that conducted surveys and various meetings.

"We looked at housing and business, but at the end of the day, what the community wanted — and they were probably right — was to have a park and enjoy the sunshine," said John Funghi, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency’s Central Subway program director.

San Francisco’s Chinatown is the densest neighborhood in the country outside of New York’s Chinatown, with only four open-space places — heavily trafficked Portsmouth Square, the Willie “Woo Woo” Wong and Woh Hei Yuen playgrounds, and St. Mary’s Square, which is slated to get a rooftop park extension in exchange for two new office towers on the rise.

The Chinatown station plaza is an opportunity to create a fifth spot, Recreation and Park Commissioner Allan Low said.

The park also provides open space for natural sunlight for reach down further into the station through the skylights. SFMTA intends to schedule a public present a the new plaze design within the next month.

Renderings: SFMTA via SF Examiner