Meanwhile, in the Muniverse...

Dispatches from San Francisco's beloved and beleaguered Municipal Railway.

sf.streetsblog.org

SFMTA to Paint the Transit Lanes Red on Mid-Market This Weekend →

The SFMTA announced that red paint will be added this weekend to the transit- and taxi-only lanes on mid-Market Street, between Fifth and 12th Streets. The treatment, already rolled out recently on bus lanes on Third Street and the Geary-O’Farrell Street couplet, is intended to make it more obvious that private auto drivers shouldn’t be in the heavily-abused Muni lanes.

“These lanes represent a low-cost, but high-impact measure to decrease travel time, by preventing cars from using transit-only lanes,” SFMTA Director Ed Reiskin said in a statement.

Meanwhile, Los Angeles has been promoting transit ridership…

While our Transbay Terminal continues to be stripped of everything nice for residents and transit riders, now would be a good time to look at how Los Angels Metro has been creating a well designed system.

Through a rebranding with consistent information and signage, better and more attractive stops and stations, some of the major ones with very high-end unique and memorable designs, LA Metro was about to attract 32% more choice riders. Choice riders are those who have a car or would use car share, but choose transit instead.

Source: vimeo.com

sfgate.com

Transbay Terminal will open without signature park →

Having already replaced the new terminal’s glass windows with drafty metal grating and high quality finishing materials inside will be stripped to bare concrete and steel, comes word the 4.5 acre rooftop park is now out as well.

But why waste money making the Transbay Terminal pleasant? If that’s what transbay commuters want, they should just buy a car and drive.

Meanwhile, On Muni (at Duboce Park)

One for Hot Men on Muni.

Meanwhile, On Muni (at Duboce Park)

One for Hot Men on Muni.

Source: davitydave

The new Godzilla movie went through the extra effort of re-desiging the logo for BART.

The producers might have just wanted to avoid licensing the actual logos. They don’t include the Muni name, but they did get the line letters and colors right.

Check out YVRhoots for more photos of Vancouver’s “Little San Franicsco” neighborhood during the filming of Godzilla.

Source: 99percentinvisible

sf.streetsblog.org

SFMTA Board Approves Contract for New Fleet of Muni Metro Trains →

The contract approval “will put us on a structured, long-term course to take care of our most immediate and pressing service need right now — to fix the very heart of our transit service network,” said Muni Operations Director John Haley.

Muni metro riders can expect breakdowns to become much less common with the new fleet. The current Breda trains have a “mean distance between failure” rate of fewer than 5,000 miles, according to Haley, which means that they break down routinely.

The Siemens trains have a proven track record and because the company’s bid was 20% below what was budget, the SFMTA Board approved the purchase of 215 instead of the originally planned 175. There’s an option to add another 85 at a later time if and when funding is secured.

The new trains will begin arriving at the end of 2016 for testing, with the first 24 going into service on the T-line for the opening of the central subway.

kirotv.com

Where does Washington State's the marijuana tax money really go? →

Now that it’s legal to sell pot in Washington, the State finds itself with a new source revenue. Most of the taxes go to public health and substance abuse services, some goes into research, education, local general funds, and a little bit goes into transit.

Based on a projection of two grams costing $54, Seattle’s sales tax will bring in 76¢ for county and regional transit.

California could do the same, with a lot of issues already having been worked out with the dispensaries. Many cities and counties already have policies in place as to how close pot can be sold and smoked near schools and playgrounds.

sfexaminer.com

Muni agreement would expand light rail fleet for future demand →

SFMTA’s Board of Directors is expected to decide on a contract for Muni’s next generation light-rail fleet at it’s meeting today. The Board has an option to expand the order from 175 trains up to 260 because the price is 20% below expectations.

Transit director John Haley can’t understate the importance of the new trains.

So gloomy.Forrest hill - San Francisco

We could do for a station beautification project. BART is revamping Powell Station, but that leaves eight more subway stations in need of some love. The years have not been kind to the stations which need more than just a good scrubbing if they’re ever going to look good again, but that’s a good place to start.

New cable tunnels were recently put up, creating new layer of conduit on top of another. It was a missed opportunity to tear out the existing conduit and run all the wiring in a single set of cable tunnels which could be properly placed without having to zig-zag around what’s already there.

It should be a principal of station work: always leave it looking better than you found it.

So gloomy.

Forrest hill - San Francisco

We could do for a station beautification project. BART is revamping Powell Station, but that leaves eight more subway stations in need of some love. The years have not been kind to the stations which need more than just a good scrubbing if they’re ever going to look good again, but that’s a good place to start.

New cable tunnels were recently put up, creating new layer of conduit on top of another. It was a missed opportunity to tear out the existing conduit and run all the wiring in a single set of cable tunnels which could be properly placed without having to zig-zag around what’s already there.

It should be a principal of station work: always leave it looking better than you found it.

Source: splitarilloqueen

Muni Metro: The Next Generation

Meet Muni’s next-generation of Metro light-rail trains, the Siemens S200. The SFMTA Board of Directors will vote on Tuesday to purchase between as many as 260 of the new trains to replace the existing 151 train fleet.

It made a bit of noise last year when the maker of Muni’s current light-rail fleet was disqualified from bidding on the next ones. Since then the SMFTA has been evaluating the options from those which did qualify, opting for off-the-shelf models with a proven track record of reliability.

Siemens’ trains often outlast their lifespan and reduce the number of moving parts (and potential problems) in doors and stairs from 200 down to 20 and will be manufactured locally, near Sacramento. The first new trains would arrive in late 2016 with the first set of 24 trains in service in for the opening of the Central Subway in 2018.

The staff recommendation (PDF) had a glowing review in it’s evaluation findings.

Exceeds All Our Procurement Objectives

  • ON TIME: Car builder has solid history of delivering Quality cars on time
  • LOCAL : The project to be delivered (including support) within 90 miles of San Francisco
  • EXTENDED LIFE: Offering 30 year design life vs. 25 years required
  • EXCEED RELIABILITY REQUIREMENTS : Offering safe, attractive vehicles with reliability more than twice specified values in the RFP
  • FASTER DELIVERY :Committed to deliver vehicles earlier than required, and also offering expedited delivery rate
  • COMPETITIVE PRICE: High value low cost cars provide the Agency the opportunity to get 215 cars with the original budget for 175 cars
  • FINANCIAL SOLUTION: Offering financing solutions to address Muni cash flow challenge

Siemens offered pricing 20% below the nearest competitor and the SFMTA Board of Directors will consider upping the order to include those 40 additional trains and adding as many as 45 more for a total of 260.

The three trains shown here are variations on a standard model from Siemens (the cabs are different, but if you look towards the middle you’ll see they share the same doors and body) but the final interior and exterior design are yet to be determined and will involve public input.

Photos: SFMTA / Light-Rail Vehicle Procurement (PDF)

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